Powershell错误处理,try catch finally


脚本的调试向来是一个艰巨的任务,在powershell出现以前简直是一场灾难。在powershell中微软终于做出了诸多改进,不但有了$Error、-whatif,也有了ISE.而在语法上也增加了try-catch-finally,终于可以便利的进行调试和错误处理了。
在该语法中,finally并不是必需的,但是个人并不建议去掉该部分。建议将功能的预处理放在try部分,但没有错误时,再在finally完成功能。
下面将用一段代码演示如何进行错误处理。主要功能是将一段字符串写道硬盘上一个新建的文件中,完成后移出变量。-NoClobber表示不覆盖现有文件。
Try
{    
$strContent = "try catch finally" 
Out-File -FilePath d:\test.txt -InputObject $strContent -NoClobber
Write-Host "文件创建成功"
}
Catch [System.UnauthorizedAccessException]
{   
Write-Host "访问失败。错误原因:"$Error[0]
}
Catch [System.IO.DirectoryNotFoundException]
{    
Write-Host "访问失败。错误原因:"$Error[0]
}
Catch
{    Write-Host "访问失败。错误原因:"$Error[0]
}
Finally
{    Remove-Variable strContent
}
按照目前的脚本运行后,成功运行,没有任何错误。如下图
1.bmp
再次运行该脚本,会报下图的错误。这正是-NoClobber发挥了作用。而我们通过System.IO.DirectoryNotFoundException捕获了该异常。在catch部分,我们可以主动去捕获可以想到的错误,这样可以提高脚本的友好性,并可以对此类错误进行主动处理,提高脚本的可用性。
2.bmp
而我们将输出文件的保存位置更改为d:\temp\这个并不存在的目录后,可以发现报如下图的提示,而这正是我们设计的结果。
3.bmp
 
 

PowerShell Tutorial – Try Catch Finally and error handling in PowerShell

One of the key parts of any good PowerShell script is error handling. Even in the shortest script, being able to handle errors helps to ensure that an unexpected event will not go on to wreck the system you are working on. Take the example below. Every week in our sample company (MyCompany.Com) Human Resources are going to upload a list telling us who should have access to the Expenses database. If a name isn’t in the list from HR we’re going to remove it from the group and that user will no longer be able to log expense claims:

$AuthorizedUsers= Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt
$CurrentUsers=Get-ADGroupMember "Expenses Claimants"
 
Foreach($User in $CurrentUsers)
{
    If($AuthorizedUsers -notcontains $User)
    {
        Remove-ADGroupMember -Identity "Expenses Claimants" -User $User
    }
}

Now, you can see where this is going to go wrong. One week HR doesn’t get around to uploading the list or, just as we are about to access the list, the file server dies. Suddenly PowerShell throws an error on the Get-Content cmdlet and the $AuthorizedUser variable remains empty. Because our script doesn’t handle errors, it continues to run and, in a very short space of time, it has removed every user from our expenses group. Pretty soon the irate phone calls start flooding in and life gets a little less happy. The way to avoid all this is to catch the errors and then handle the event that caused them (which in this case is halt the script and have a shout at someone in HR).

Terminating and Non-Terminating Errors

One of the key things to know when catching errors is that only certain errors can be caught by default. Errors come in two types – terminating and non-terminating. A terminating error is an error that will halt a function or operation. If you make a syntax error or run out of memory, that is a terminating error. Terminating errors can be caught and handled. Non-terminating errors allow Powershell to continue and usually come from cmdlets or other managed situations. Under normal circumstances they cannot be caught by Try-Catch-Finally. The Get-Content error in the example above is a non-terminating error.

Treating Non-Terminating Errors as Terminating

So how do you catch a Non-Terminating error? Basically, you tell PowerShell to treat it as terminating. To do this you use the ErrorAction parameter. Every PowerShell cmdlet supports ErrorAction. By specifying -ErrorAction Stop on the end of a cmdlet you ensure that any errors it throws are treated as terminating and can be caught. In our example above we are going to change our Get-Content line to:

$AuthorizedUsers= Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt -ErrorAction Stop

Treating All Errors as Terminating

It is also possible to treat all errors as terminating using the ErrorActionPreference variable. You can do this either for the script your are working with or for the whole PowerShell session. To set it in a script, make the first line $ErrorActionPreference = Stop. To set it for the session, type $ErrorActionPreference = Stop at the PowerShell console.

Catching a Terminating Error

Once you have ensured that the error you are trying to catch is going to be treated as terminating, you can build a Try Catch block around the command (or commands) that might cause the error. The first stage is to surround the section of your script that may throw the error with a Try block. In our example the Get-Content line becomes:

Try
{
    $AuthorizedUsers= Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt -ErrorAction Stop
}

Immediately after the Try block you must place a Catch block to deal with the error. The Catch block is only accessed if a terminating error occurs, otherwise it is ignored. In our example we are going to email an admin to say that there has been an error and then halt the script. Our Get-Content line is now:

Try
{
    $AuthorizedUsers= Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt -ErrorAction Stop
}
Catch
{
    Send-MailMessage -From ExpensesBot@MyCompany.Com -To WinAdmin@MyCompany.Com -Subject "HR File Read Failed!" -SmtpServer EXCH01.AD.MyCompany.Com
    Break
}

Accessing The Error Record

Once you are inside a catch block you can access the error record, which is stored in the current object variable, $_. Error records have various useful properties, but the main one you will want to access is $_.Exception. Exceptions are what we are really dealing with here as we catch and deal with errors – exceptions are the unexpected event that caused the error (the error record itself is actually only really a wrapper for presenting the exception to the PowerShell user). It is the exception that we are catching and the exception that contains all the really useful information about the problem. If there was a further underlying problem that caused our exception, it is also recorded at $_.exception.innerexception (and so on – the next underlying exception is stored at $_.exception.innerexception.innerexception etc.). For the purposes of our example we are going to use $_.Exception to put some extra information into our notification email, using the $_.Exception.Message and $_.Exception.ItemName properties:

Try
{
    $AuthorizedUsers= Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt -ErrorAction Stop
}
Catch
{
    $ErrorMessage = $_.Exception.Message
    $FailedItem = $_.Exception.ItemName
    Send-MailMessage -From ExpensesBot@MyCompany.Com -To WinAdmin@MyCompany.Com -Subject "HR File Read Failed!" -SmtpServer EXCH01.AD.MyCompany.Com -Body "We failed to read file $FailedItem. The error message was $ErrorMessage"
    Break
}

Catching Specific Exceptions

Now, as our example stands we are catching any errors that occur during the file read and dealing with all of them in the same way. You can however catch specific exceptions and deal with them differently, but – and it’s a big but – only if the original error is terminating. Because the Get-Content cmdlet throws non-terminating errors (that we have only treated as terminating using ErrorAction) we cannot specifically catch the different exceptions that the cmdlet might throw. This is a feature of PowerShell and applies to any non-terminating error, regardless of the ErrorActionPreference and cannot be changed. Still, we can deal with other terminating exceptions, such as an out of memory error, that could crop up during the read operation. For the purposes of this example that is what we will do.

You catch specific terminating errors by specifying the exception name immediately after the Catch keyword. In our example we want to catch a System.OutOfMemory exception and, if we get one, will take the no nonsense approach of rebooting the computer immediately. We will also include a general catch block after our file not found block to catch all other exceptions:

Try
{
    $AuthorizedUsers= Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt -ErrorAction Stop
}
Catch [System.OutOfMemoryException]
{
    Restart-Computer localhost
}
Catch
{
    $ErrorMessage = $_.Exception.Message
    $FailedItem = $_.Exception.ItemName
    Send-MailMessage -From ExpensesBot@MyCompany.Com -To WinAdmin@MyCompany.Com -Subject "HR File Read Failed!" -SmtpServer EXCH01.AD.MyCompany.Com -Body "We failed to read file $FailedItem. The error message was $ErrorMessage"
    Break
}

Finally, Using Finally

The last part of Try Catch Finally is the Finally block. This must be defined immediately after the Catch block and runs every time, regardless of whether there was an error or not. In this way you can perform actions that need to be made regardless of whether an operation succeeds or fails. In our example we are going to log that a file read was attempted. Our Get-Content line now looks like:

Try
{
    $AuthorizedUsers = Get-Content \\ FileServer\HRShare\UserList.txt -ErrorAction Stop
}
Catch [System.OutOfMemoryException]
{
    Restart-Computer localhost
}
Catch
{
    $ErrorMessage = $_.Exception.Message
    $FailedItem = $_.Exception.ItemName
    Send-MailMessage -From ExpensesBot@MyCompany.Com -To WinAdmin@MyCompany.Com -Subject "HR File Read Failed!" -SmtpServer EXCH01.AD.MyCompany.Com -Body "We failed to read file $FailedItem. The error message was $ErrorMessage"
    Break
}
Finally
{
    $Time=Get-Date
    "This script made a read attempt at $Time" | out-file c:\logs\ExpensesScript.log -append
}


posted @ 2016-10-09 12:14  特洛伊-Micro  阅读(7186)  评论(0编辑  收藏  举报